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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 169 (some duplicates have been removed)
, the folks that were elected with us, the senators that have arrived in the last five or ten years. i think we have the ability to respond in a big, bold way to the crises that face us. and i know senator merkley, you came here a young man with senator hatfield i believe and you saw a different senate. maybe you could talk about that and we don't want to stay, i know we're going to a caucus and we have our generous chair here, so we don't want to keep her up there too long, our presiding officer. anyway, senator merkley, i yield. mr. merkley: i think my colleague from new mexico is absolutely right in pointing out there were periods when the senate really worked to address the big issues facing america. and it wawnltd that there weren't -- wasn't that there weren't profound differences. there were fierce differences, emotional differences, deep differences but folks came to this floor, they conversed, they laid out their arguments and ultimately they made decisions about which way to go. and they didn't bring the attitude let's just paralyze this chamber from doing doing nothing. had they d
with an election victory. >> did germany's education minister plagiarize her phd? her university launches an investigation. talk about putting a cap amongst the pigeons a day after german and french leaders pledged to deepen e u's economic and monetary union. the british prime minister has signaled his country could want out. >> in a very -- delayed speech, david cameron said he wants to renegotiate the terms of britain's membership and the referendum, but not until the end of 2017. >> that has rattled london's biggest allies and some investors. more uncertainty and possible of people are not what they have been wishing for. >> kamen said he'd campaigned for es you vote, saying he had won the decisions he had -- the concessions he had campaigned on. >> the move had long been anticipated at home and across the european union. david cameron laid out his vision of britain's future. it is one that involves major changes and giving the british public a say in what happens. >> when that referendum comes, let me say now that if we can negotiate such an arrangement, i will campaign for it with al
>> one of the first to cast the vote in israel's election. you're watching "al jazeera." we meet a boy who feels betrayed by the world. the u.n. intervenes in the south china seas. police officers in mexico say they have had enough. israelis are voting in their general election. binyamin netanyahu is a clear favorite to win another term in office. we're covering the election for us of there. is it shaping up? .> we're in west jerusalem there have been a steady trickle of voters coming and. sraelis are is re eligible to vote. it looks like to be a good turnout. the question is to what extend binyamin netanyahu can claim a mandate for victory. prime minister binyamin netanyahu casting his ballot. >> want them to succeed. >> he has a commanding lead in all polls. there are new kids on israel's political bloc. >> he is trying to make this campaign a personal campaign on his ability to be the prime minister. yes or no? specific questions about policies. >> the votes have been dominating the headlines. the likud party ran on a single ballad. have lost support to this man. they appealed
elections, is thinking fast or has been over the past two weeks of the popularity threshold and angela merkel has been riding and both of their parties are dithering. the sbc slightly inching higher and the sdu inching lower and they're both losing ground in a grander scale. it's the small parties that are the winners, definitely the green wes a record high of over 13%. they're the ones that won the election and lost it for the cdu, not stoeshl democrats themselves. and the liberals, the sdp, many had counted them out and there was an expectation or there was a fear for some that they couldn't even make the century hurdle that you need to get into parliament. they beat that. about you also for the personality ratings and the criticism on a federal scale, but that was his home turf so there was a lot of sympathy vote going in there. the big parties will have to look carefully for coalition partners. the social democrats will try to align themselves with the green that might not be enough. the stronger the greens get, the more the social democrats usually lose and something similar you h
pushed back hard. >> rose: we conclude this evening with the a look at the surprising elections in israel with david remnick, mort zuckerman, and dennis ross. >> i don't want us to be deluded and think because lapid somehow got an outsized amount of votes suddenly the country has moved dramatically to the left. it has not. it has not. and i think we need to have a more tragic sense of what's going on in terms of the palestinian question, which is the one that concerns us the most. certainly it is in the top three of the big questions about israel. and there's not going to be dramatic movement on that at all. >> rose: what happened in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimon
in benghazi, and the israeli elections when we continue. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: we begin this evening with secretary of state clinton on capitol hill. lawmakers questions her earlier today about the september 11, 2012 attacks on the american consulate in benghazi, libya. four americans were killed that day, including ambassador christopher stevens. secretary clinton's testimony had been post toned until now. she took responsibility and emsized her commitment to improving diplomat security abroad. >> as i have mentioned many times i take responsibility and nobody is more committed to getting this right. i am determined to leave the state department and our country safer, stronger, and more secure. now, taking responsibility meant moving quickly in those first uncertain hours and days to respond to the immediate crisis, but, also, to further protect our people and posts in high-threat areas across the region and the world. it meant launching an independent investigation to determine exactly what happened in b
democratic election. but one year later, military forces carried out a coup on the grounds they were protecting the republican system. >> translator: algerian history has a precedent for terrorist tactics, leading to victory. in the case of the war of independence against france. so in a sense, there's a kind of justification for terrorism, and at the same time, there's the idea of never surrendering in the face of terrorism coming from the enemy. >> reporter: the civil war claimed the lives of 200,000 people. it involved indiscriminate bombings and widespread human rights violations. president abdelaziz bouteflika was elected for the first time in 1999. he was re-elected in 2004 and 2009. bouteflika chose to deal with militant groups in two ways. he invited them to lay down their weapons to participate in rebuilding the nation. and at the same time, he continued cracking down on their activities. observers say this approach has gained broad support amongst public. >> translator: the government was afraid that negotiating with the kidnappers and making concessions could lead to a los
democratic elections to take place in the north african country in 1991. when the islamic salvation front won the first round, the government called off the voting and cracked down on islamists, forcing many underground. including a notorious terrorist leader with ties to al qaeda. he is reportedly behind this week's attack on the remote desert gas plant. though he first made a name for himself with a string of violent attacks and dramatic kidnappings after he joined an extremist group in the late 1990's. the terror has continued to this day, but the extremists seemed to be losing support. for many algerians, even an authoritarian regime is preferable to an islamist state. algeria is rich in resources, especially gas and oil. and it has hardly any public debt, but average algerians see little benefit from the country's richest. although there is great dissatisfaction from the government, it has not helped the islamists' cause. there's too much fear the country could once again descend into civil war. >> france is reporting some initial successes in mali where government troops had recaptured
a landslide victory in the country's first democratic election. but one year later, military forces carried out a coup on the grounds they were protecting the republican system. >> translator: algerian history has a precedent for terrorist tactics, leading to victory. in the case of the war of independence against france. so in a sense, there's a kind of justification for terrorism, and at the same time, there's the idea of never surrendering in the face of terrorism coming from the enemy. >> reporter: the civil war claimed the lives of 200,000 people. it involved indiscriminate bombings and widespread human rights violations. president abdelaziz bouteflika was elected for the first time in 1999. he was re-elected in 2004 and 2009. bouteflika chose to deal with militant groups in two ways. he invited them to lay down their weapons to participate in rebuilding the nation. and at the same time, he continued cracking down on their activities. observers say this approach has gained broad support amongst public. >> translator: the government was afraid that negotiating with the kidnappers and ma
netanyahu's right-wing coalition wins a narrow victory in israel's general election. a centrist party makes an unexpected strong showing. >>> welcome to nhk world "newsline." experts following the move buys north korea are watching the clock. they say it's only a matter of time before the country carries out another nuclear test. north korean leaders promised to boost their military power in reaction to a u.n. security council resolution condemning their recent rocket launch. security council members passed the resolution unanimously. it expands existing sanctions, adding four individuals and six organizations, including the space agency. assets will be frozen and the individuals will also face a travel ban. officials in pyongyang are showing defiance. >> this suggests north korean authorities are prepared to conduct a third nuclear tests following ones in 2006 and 2009. they also declared they will no longer recognize a joint statement in 2005 from the six party talks on their nuclear development. that includes plans for the country to abandon all nuclear weapons and programs. officials fr
were reelected in the general election here in 2015, it would be part of their mandate and the platform that there would offer the british people and in-out referendum around 2018. so five years from now. the great concern of this, even if there is agreement in the european union, the great concern is that now a leading prime minister from a leading european country has said the sellout and other european countries might follow suit. the worry in big european capitals like paris and berlin is whether this will be criticized and if europe will only be as strong as its most skeptical parts. and the worry is that europe might start to collapse from the outside in words. so i don't think that they will take this speech very kindly one bit. i certainly don't think that they will want to acknowledge the kind of change that mr. chairman has said is necessary. >> israel's prime minister and his right-wing bloc has done worse than expected in parliamentary elections. benjamin netanyahu is coming victory. now he has to negotiate with other fiscal parties to form a broader coalition. >> i am proud
an inflation target of 2%. >>> people in israel are casting ballots in a prime election. benjamin netanyahu is expected to keep his job. >>> welcome to nhk "newsline." central bank policy makers have agreed to give shinzo abe what he wants, a 2% inflation target. it's part of abe's plan to tackle deflation with bolder, monetary easing measures. bank of japan and eight others agreed on it saying they. boj officials have previously made it a goal to bring 1% inflation within reach but the new, clearer target requires some bold steps. the document also addresses the role of the government in revitalizing japan's economy. it describes how politicians should promote growth and restore fiscal health. along with drafting the joint statement, boj officials have agreed to introduce open-ended asset purchasing. under a new program from january 2014 the central bank will purchase a certain amount of financial assets every month. no termination date is being set for the scheme. the new measure will expand the total size of the asset purchase program, or app, by about 10 trillion yen, or $110 billion, i
doesn't have to worry about being re-elected. he's got four years left and it's an opportunity for him to really go for it. >> well, i think we're going to see a president with a new level and a new kind of resolve as we did through the campaign. i think we're going to see some of the things we heard about already in terms of immigration reform and new moves around gun safety. i think we'll see some progress on the peacekeeping around the world, and we will see an emphasis on economic growth, which is absolutely key. >> now, he's obviously facing big, tough challenges certainly economically, and also with the republicans who still hold the house. it's a fine line, isn't it? he's already shown a sign since he got re-elected he's not going to take any nonsense from the republicans and he's being pretty tough on them. but that's not necessarily going to help him get stuff done. it may, if anything, make them more intransgent. how does he play that tricky line? >> well, you know, probably he's the better one to answer that question, but i think it's more and more apparent to the american p
to be an obstructionist party. they read the election results and they'll make nice on some things. but it will be very tough going for him. not to say it is impossible, but don't try to do too many things. president clinton who in many ways was a very effective president, he loved to undertake 75 or 80 things on at once. president obama can't do that. his number one priorities have to be peace, world peace, of course, number one, and number two take what is happening now with the economy and move it forward. jobs, jobs, jobs. and his number three problem is he faces a staunchly obstructionist party in opposition. i would expect him to concentrate on trying to get his health reform package, otherwise known as obama care, sort of put in concrete. it's still vulnerable in places. and tweak it. i'll be very surprised if he doesn't make that if not his first priority, his number one legislative priority. >> grover norquist, do you have your battering rams ready for the president? the debt ceiling bustup to come. the republicans making clear they'll fight him all the way on that. i get a sense the president
elections, drowning out the voices of ordinary american citizens eager to participate in the political process. citizens united also epitomizes the so-called corporate personhood movement in which some now say the corporations are people. the fact is corporations are not people, and the constitution was never intended to give corporations the same rights as the american people. corporations don't breathe. they don't have kids, and they don't die in wars. my constituents continue to express concern about the growing influence of corporations in our political discourse. they're also demanding action on campaign finance reform because they are repulsed by the large amount of money in our campaigns. and quite frankly, they want elected officials to spend more time on policy, deliberating and debating on issues and less time dialing for dollars. unfortunately, the republican leadership in the house has failed to address these pressing issues during the past two years. they have been indifferent. we haven't had the opportunity to vote on any legislation to curb the influence of unlimited and
in the past election. host: on twitter -- james in dickinson, texas, democratic caller. caller: good morning. that was a great speech that the president and vice president spoke yesterday. i have been watching it ever since it came on. i want to say hello to my pastor at the baptist church. i'm sure he's listening, and to all the church members. host: a little bit more from president obama's speech yesterday, talking about defending democracy abroad. [video clip] >> we still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. [[cheers and applause] our brave men and women in uniform tempered by the flames of battle are unmatched in skill and courage. our citizens, feared by the memory of those we have lostthoseknow too well the price it has paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war. we have turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends and we must carry those lessons into this time as well. we will defend our people and
banks are putting in. we're through the u.s. elections, ahead of the debt ceiling debate. in some sense there isn't an immediate crisis. it's a question now whether ceos can get through the real economic fundamentals. in some ways we're betwiked and between, kelly. >> i like the scarf, ross. >> yeah. that's the point. look, there's plenty to come on our coverage today. let me recap some of the people we're going to be talking to. john lipinski, formerly of the imf. and hamish tyrwhitt, construction group out of australia. we saw rates dip a little today. suggesting there's room to cut rates. and the executive dean of peking university. we're more relaxed about china, more relaxed than three or four months ago. we'll get the inside there. all of that is coming up on today's "worldwide exchange." how are the markets looking? >> perfect. we'll check the markets in a second. i want to bring news out of the bank upon spain saying fourth quarter gdp was down 1.not -- 1.7% drop, it was .6 drop. pretty large. and 2012 gdp down 1.3%, down from a contraction of 0.4% in 2011. more difficult news f
an inflation target of 2%. >>> people in israel are casting ballots in a general election. prime minister netanyahu is expected to keep his job. but the country may shift further to the right. >>> welcome to nhk "newsline." japan's central bank policymakers agreed to give shinzo abe what he's been pushing for, a 2% inflation target. it's included in the boj plan with the government. it's part of abe's plan to tackle deflation with bolder, monetary easing measures. bank of japan governor and eight other board members agreed on a policy at the end of a two-day meeting. the announcement says financial authorities will try to reach the target at their earliest possible time. boj officials have previously made it a goal to bring 1% inflation within reach but the new, clearer target requires some bold steps. the document also addresses the role of the government in revitalizing japan's economy. it describes how politicians should promote growth and restore fiscal health. along with drafting the joint statement, boj officials have agreed to introduce open-ended asset purchasing. under a new prog
that we chiefs are buying this is because they were appointed by mayors who were elected who are telling them precisely what to do. urban centers -- if i may finish -- urban centers are a liberal bastion. that is not result in warm and fuzzy feelings for the second amendment. >> that is where we see the massacres occurring is in places where guns are banned. you look over the past 20 years all the shooting massacres would occur in places where guns were banned. the ultimate hypocrisy that there is 1800 cops guarding our congressmen on any given day that is why these tragedies are occurring. [talking over each other] [talking over each other] lou: i think we can agree with this. it's a lot more complicated than that. i would say to both sides, do not oversimplify and let's maintain at least some intellectual discussion. mental health in the and the treatment is a relevant issue that should be discussed. these shootings are far more the responsibility of people who are mentally ill and who have not received appropriate treatment than they are of guns. >> go down the list. [talking over eac
be more tkeufpbt it turned out t difficult it turned out to be. it was a narrow election. he has that ahead of him. not to mention the things that haunt a second term which none of us can imagine today. >> you can see former president clinton and secretary of state clinton. who is going to be testifying before congress in a less friendly atmosphere later this week. i was reading obama's first inaugural address today, because i thought, you know, let's get a sense of what it is that he said four years ago. i want to read you two lines. on this day we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and falls promises the recriminations and warn out doug mas that for far too long have strangled our politics. that is an incomplete at best. not all the president's fault but also counterparts on capitol hill. but we are still strangled by that kind of division. talking about national security and the global war on terror, we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals. that was part of the promise he was going to make to shut down guantanamo, to end enhanced interrogat
. >> on that front, when you say that, recent tradition, at least, right, the person who lost the election is supposed to be there. that would be mitt romney. >> yeah. >> no? >> he's not going to be there. i just checked before coming on to double check with a source close to romney who says that he, as far as they know, he didn't get an invitation. that he wasn't invited. you know, we're not -- we haven't had time to check that with the white house, but i think what we have been used to seeing are the rivals of presidents coming because they have positions of power that cause them to be here. for example, john mccain is a senator. john kerry who lost to george bush is a senator. al gore who lost, remember that just a little bit in 2000, he was the vice president, so he had to be there. and one other interesting note is that speaking of bush, george w. bush and george h.w. bush, father and son, neither will be here. george 41, the older, was in the hospital. he was just released. the younger said that he is not coming because he wants to be with his father. we know, covering george bush, h
. to gender quotas exist for increasing women elected to government bodies? at a public education programs conducted by the state to emphasize the importance of balance representation in all elected bodies and so on? i condemned they are not universal human rights. they have little to do with equality of opportunity. they're they are essentially a partisan political positions of western progressives of the western left. come off as universal human rights. in the u.n. monitoring committee to france in 2000 make company said you're doing a good job unpolitical pairing. 50% of candidates for municipal elections is good. but you don't have 50% of women on corporate boards or financial institutions. surveys suggest instituting financial sanctions against companies that did not address these differences. the u.n. committee went to germany 2004, demanded that the federal government had conduct a study on my fathers are not without and to parental leave. it's not just a state policy. it's a national policy. there's not many men taking advantage. why is in a quick sweat as you and start having a qu
, his inaugural speech was very domestically focused. look, we just had elections in israel, john kerry not in the same place benjamin netanyahu is regarding a two-state solution, at least right now. there are huge challenges, iran, there are huge challenges in the foreign policy front that don't get talked about as much, but are clearly things that not only will be difficult for the president and his team to navigate, but will also have a significant say in how this president is viewed by history. >> and, by the way, we just got word that the white house is going to proceed with a nomination of general allen to be the nato supreme allied commander now that he's been cleared by the pentagon investigation going back to the petraeus case. thanks to all of you, david sanger and kelly o'donnell, of course, and chris cillizza, see you later. thanks very much. >>> clinton today put a lot of blame on congress for withholding aid. >> we have to get our act together between the administration and congress. if this is a priority and if we are serious about trying it help this government stand up
of the court, my fellow statewide elected officials, members of the washington state legislature, members of our armed forces and national guard, members of the consular corps, governor mike lowry, and governor christine gregoire, and all of my fellow washingtonians, this we know, our world is changing faster and more dramatically than ever before. once in a lifetime events now seem to happen with startling regularity. we've seen the greatest financial crisis since the great depression, natural disasters fueled by climate change, and unimaginable human tragedies like sandy hook elementary. but we also bear witness to rapid breakthroughs in technology, medicine, and the fundamental understanding of our universe. every day i am left in awe at how much we are able to achieve, and heartbroken over the tragedies that we have had to endure. we truly live in extraordinary times. we also live in an extraordinary state, filled with extraordinary people. where the world sees uncertainty, we washingtonians see opportunity. and we all feel a profound responsibility to our children and our grandchildr
spending sequester, you risk losing control of the house in the 2014 election. why? well, i know the democrats won't cut spending either, but i also know the conservative base of the republican party will stay home or walk away. and, frankly, coming out of your retreat in williamsburg, virginia, i didn't hear the key message of deep spending cuts, not the message that deep spending cuts will help grow the economy and help create jobs. . . but i did hear no budget, no pay, aimed at democratic senators but then deemed unconstitutional, and an extension of the debt ceiling for about three months which is okay. . it doesn't really go to the heart of the matter. we're going to have a report on this whole story in just a moment. . meanwhile, better news, the stock rally continues up 54 points on the dow, 161 points for the week. get this, a 35% gain in the broad s&p 500. . just since early october 2011. that's right. it's like a stealth rally. it keeps on moving. we'll talk to a leading investment ceo a bit later in the program. . first up, in williamsburg, virginia, today, house repub
a presidential election underway, and the chinese were using a not too subtle way of explaining to them what they wanted the outcome of that election to be. thises was an unacceptable form of military coercion and both the general and i agreed that a strong response was needed by the united states, something more than a diplomatic letter of protest. after some discussion we agreed to send two carrier battle groups to taiwan. within an hour the president had approved our recommendation and before the day was over, though carrier battle groups were underway steaming to taiwan. at a press conference the next day, i was asked would i not fear this would lead to military clash with china. i said, i was not concerned of that. and when asked why, i said, i think, well, because we have the best damn navy in the world. this was not an extravagant or hyper bolic statement t. was simply a statement of fact. it was a fact that not only i knew. it was a fact which other nations understood. even one carrier battle group had more military fire power than any other nation's entire navy, and we had two of t
in a general election. opinion polls suggest they'll keep prime minister benjamin netanyahu in power. netanyahu called early elections in october after his coalition failed to agree on the annual budget. his likud party and his nationalist coalition party israel betananu have led in the polls. the party opposes peace talks with the palestinians. netanyahu resumed the building of jewish settlements in occupied territories two years ago. the construction breaches international law and contributed to a breakdown in the peace process. >>> the prime minister has devoted quite a bit of time urging the bank of japan to do something. what's he hoping for? >> the prime minister has been very adamant about getting japan out of deflation. he doesn't feel his administration can do that task alone. that's why he's asking for simultaneously monetary action. the policy makers are about to give abe what he's been pushing for the bank of japan officials will likely announce a 2% inflation target. the target is part of abe's plan to tackle inflation with bolder, monetary easing measures. board members will decid
elections, which are meant to be different than legislative elections -- remember that we have two branches of government that the framers decided would be controlled by a majority vote. that is the executive and legislative. they did a pretty good job of keeping their fingers in the air, right? i think that people have a right to lobby. i think for people do not have the same access as rich people. i think for people have a lot of things that they cannot do because of the resources they have available, but i think lobbying in general, as long as it is not anything that is secretive, and that is one of the big problems in lobbying -- the secret of aspects of it -- but as long as they do not violate the law, there is going to be lobbying. i think a bigger problem and one that i'm glad i have a couple of minutes to talk about, is the political action committees coming into states and targeting judges. that is a huge problem. look at what happened in iowa. you had a supreme -- you know about the judges that got removed? we do not know about that? ok, let me talk about that for a second year of
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 169 (some duplicates have been removed)